A late 18th early 19th century timber framed, plastered, house. It was owned in the mid-19th century by John Holmes on of the prominent solicitors in the town. From 1912 to 1935 the house was the home of the Rev. David Coghlan (Catholic) and served as the Presbytery before the Catholic parish church...

This appears to be a late 18th or early 19th century building incorporating structural elements dating from about 1500. The building is constructed on an E-W axis there being a cross wing at the south end. The recorded memories of Henry Harrison, who grew up in the street in the latter part of the 1...

A 17th century timber framed, plastered, cottage with exposed beams and 20th century additions. In 1680 John Ruggles, one of the main clothiers of the day, bought this “improved residence” which had been part of a medieval rambling mansion. The property had originally been called Stockwell House, th...

Morant the Essex historian (1768), suggests that Bradfords Farm (Little Bradfords) takes its name from the family of Bradford who lived there in the reign of King John (1199-1216).<br><br>Thomas Wright’s History of Essex, 1836 details the lineage and ownership of the manor of Bradfords from the de B...

This house was built in about 1720 on the site of a much earlier building from which some timbers and the chimney-stack were reused. It has typical Queen Anne features, corbels under the eaves, arched window tops, double roof and gully. Inside there is a fine staircase and some excellent 18th centur...

This group was originally built as one house along the road front (about 1550) but was later sub-divided and wings added at the rear. Note how 10 has been stretched by approximately five feet to provide additional ceiling height at ground floor level, possibly to accommodate weaving machinery. Perio...

This group were all built between 1490 and 1540. No. 16 being at right-angles to the road, and Nos. 18 and 20 parallel with the road. There is evidence in the frame work that there was at least one more dwelling attached to No. 20, and this might have been another crosswing similar to No. 16. No. 16...

This was originally built in the 15th or 16th century as a 2 storey building parallel to the street. It had a gable on the north end and half-hip to the south. The present condition of the building which includes a small gabled 16th century staircase tower, with a 17th century staircase at the rear,...

Originally a single house the impressive 18th century facade conceals a timber framed building from circa 1400, which as far as can be ascertained is a T shaped plan, the rear wing of which is contemporary. The quality of the mouldings to the ceiling joists in the older part are extremely high class...

This is an 18th century gault brick building, altered again in the 19th century, it is an imposing structure comparable to but not of such good quality as No. 4. The interior has a panelled room on the ground storey and a linenfold oak panel dado. There is a good original door case at the rear, and ...

This building was rebuilt by the Gosling family after its publicised sale in 1855. It had been since before the mid 16th century the "Cardinal's Hat" public house, so called after Cardinal Wolsey who, when being made a Regent in Rome, sent a coach to England to collect a hat which he had left behind...

The 18th century facade hides a formerly jettied timber framed building dated to about 1500 on the evidence of tree-ring dating. The Georgian front and Mansard roof are thought to have been added in 1787 as were the addition of two chimny breasts and the internal rearrangement of rooms. This date co...

No. 52 17th century timber famed house refronted in the 18th century, although given the history of many properties in the street its origins could be much earlier. It is first identified as the King’s Head inn with brewery behind in the will of Samuel Tabor in 1784 when it was bequeathed to his son...

The main block of these was built in the early 16th century but the roof was rebuilt in the 17th century and the building refronted in the 18th century. There is a long rear wing along Phillips Chase, with a gatehouse at the farther end. The first floor is open throughout this wing indicating some f...

The ceiling joists are a plain indication of its original date - about 1450. Late 18th century documents identify this building as the “Rose and Crown” whilst the inn is mentioned as early as 1671. The Mansard roof was rebuilt in the 18th century. In 1803 it was owned by the Gosling family, the loca...

The mid-20th century semi-detached houses standing here replaced cottages and the tenements which had once been the "Swan Inn", an 18th century hostelry, demolished in the 1939 slum clearance. The inn had a gatehouse to the rear and was joined to 78, the end timbers of which can still be seen expose...

This block was built as one house, of a quality associated with someone of the status of a modest merchant in about 1450. This is evidenced by the Crown Post which is not as well ornamented as is to be found in houses built by wealthier folk. It was originally jettied but this was removed by about 1...

The house was first built in the 16th Century and probably jettied to the street. To the rear of the property further bays were later added at right angles to the road. These may have started life in the 16th Century with a single floor and then built upwards in the 17th Century. This is a plastered...

This is a typical 3 bay 2 storey mid-16th century timber framed house with many construction details of the period. It is worthy of note as the frame is more than 75% complete, which is unusual as records show that so many were later extensively altered. The windows showing on the front are modern (...

A timber-framed and plastered building probably 17th century with 18th and 19th century alterations. The frame suggests it could be part of a much earlier medieval hall house. The arched doorways at ground level were cut from a piece of wood that included both trunk and branch indicating a 14th cent...

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